• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London.<br>US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DRURY, JOTHAM. PLANNING THE BOSTON TEA PARTY. Autograph Document Signed. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. US$ 50,000 - 70,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CORINTH, MISSISSIPPI IN 1862. Albumen print photograph. US$ 1,000 - 1,500.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. US$ 15,000 - 20,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [EDISON, THOMAS ALVA. 1847-1931.] Engraved $1 Bill, Endorsed and Signed by Charles L. Clarke on face. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. US$ 15,000 - 25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CASSIDY, BUTCH. Carte-de-visite police photograph.<br>US$ 20,000 - 30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [BUFFALO BILL.] <i>The Great Train Hold-Up & Bandit Hunters of the Union Pacific</i>. US$ 3,000 - 5,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> MONTESQUIEU Refflexions sur le caractere de quelques Princes. [1734]. 68 autograph pages.<br>Estimate €150,000-200,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LOUIS XVI Autograph letter to Gabrielle de Polignac. (VERSAILLES) 12 SEPTEMBRE 1789. Estimate €10,000-15,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LOUIS XVI Autograph letter to Gabrielle de Polignac. PARIS, 9 FÉVRIER 1790.<br>Estimate €15,000-20,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> SCHEDEL, Hartmann. Liber chronicarum. July 1493. Richly annotated by a French humanist.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris: Livres et Manuscrits, 26 NOVEMBER 2013.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> GAUGUIN, Paul. The first known letter to his wife Mette. 1883. Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> MAURRAS, Charles. Letter to general Franco. 30 août 1935. And 5 first editions inscribed to Anatole France, Ramon Fernandez...<br>Estimate €8,000-12,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> PROUST. Placard for A l’ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs, with a long autograph passage, remained unpublished.<br>Estimate €30,000-40,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris: Livres et Manuscrits, 26 NOVEMBER 2013.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> [PROUST] – André GIDE. The draft for the famous letter from Gide to Proust repenting about his refusal to publish him. 10 or 11 January 1914. Estimate €100,000-150,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> DELAUNAY, Sonia. 3 drawings for La Prose du Transsibérien’s prospectus. 1913. Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> CELINE. Voyage au bout de la nuit. 1932. André Breton’s copy with an inscription by Céline. Estimate €10,000-15,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LINDBERGH, Charles. Photographic portrait, inscribed to Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. 1939. €2,500-3,500.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - January - 2014 Issue

Forty-Nine Years for The Pages of Yesteryear

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Catalogue #49.

The Pages of Yesteryear has issued their annual date-numbered catalogue. This one is number 49. It celebrates 49 years in the book business. This catalogue offers an eclectic mix of mainly shorter length material, much of it written by hand. There are diaries and such, one of a kind items primarily from the 19th century. They quickly display how much times have changed. The material here is rare if not unique, and generally quite fascinating. Here are some samples of what you will find.

 

Item 4 is an eight-panel promotional piece for Charles J. Strobel's lighter than air Strobel Airships, from 1908. That timing may make Strobel sound like something of an aviation pioneer, and to some extent he was, but he didn't fly his airships or airplanes. Strobel was a businessman, and evidently one of the best in Toledo at the time. Strobel had previously owned Toledo's professional baseball team, the legendary Toledo Mud Hens, still in business today with their quirky name (it was named for the mud hens that lived near the team's original ballpark). By 1904, Strobel was in the aviation business, but as a showman, not someone looking to advance transportation. In 1908, he was promoting shows featuring his dirigibles. Strobel's airships featured a large, balloon-like gas bag filled with hydrogen (like the Hindenburg) with a thin metal frame below, holding a propeller, engine to run it, a rudder, and a pilot. Sometimes it all worked well and other times it nipped buildings on the ground. This accordion-style fold-out announces “winning international contests at St. Louis, Mo. October 23, 1907.” This is true. Some 100,000 people reportedly attended the St. Louis show the previous year to watch competitions in heavier than air (airplanes) and lighter than air vehicles. The top two finishers in the lighter than air category both operated Strobel airships (only 3 of 8 contestants finished). Strobel would turn to airplanes a bit later with his Strobel International Aviation Company performing at shows in 1911. I have not been able to trace what happened to this business after 1911, but Strobel himself died in 1915. Priced at $350.

 

Most nations don't have a problem dealing with their flag, even if boundaries change, but the symbolism of the American flag led to a serious problem. It began with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing the 13 states. When Vermont and Kentucky were added in 1794, that was increased to 15 stars and 15 stripes. However, as the numbers continued to grow, a serious problem arose. The result was that Congress was forced to appoint a committee to come up with an answer to the issue, and on January 2, 1817, they came back with this: Report of the Select Committee appointed...to inquire into the expediency of altering the Flag of the United States. They determined that it would be inexpedient to increase the number of stripes because flags generally come in a fixed size, and adding more stripes “would necessarily decrease their magnitude, and render them proportionately less distinct to distant observation.” Therefore, they recommended returning the stripes to the original 13 but adding another star for each new state. Sounds like a good plan! It was adopted and we haven't looked back since. Item 18. $250.

 

Item 5 is a manuscript of ten pages in a composition book by schoolgirl Beatrice Bernardino from 1911. In it, she writes a brief history of the old Winthrop school, which closed that year. It had once been a girls school, but many years earlier merged with an associated boys school, and was now about to be subsumed into the new Abraham Lincoln School. Miss Bernardino discusses some of the famous graduates such as the children of William Lloyd Garrison. There are also separate essays including “A Vacation in Weston,” “Thanksgiving at Grandma's,” and “Christmas Shopping.” $75.

 

Here is a letter from another young lady, apparently in boarding school, to Mom, from January 28, 1824. Miss B.P. Howell writes from Philadelphia to her mother, Anna, at “Fancy Hill.” Fancy Hill was a magnificent estate across the Delaware River from Philadelphia in New Jersey belonging to the Howell family at the time, so this letter fits with the known history. The young lady was likely the daughter of Col. Joshua Howell and his wife Anna Blackwood Howell. She pleads for permission to take dancing lessons. She explains,”...for it is very unpleasant to see people all knowing how to dance.” She points out that a cousin is taking lessons. “If I begin the first of February I shall have a quarter but if you thing [sic] a quarter will cost to much permit me to go half a quarter.” We do not know whether Mama agreed to her request, but we can be confident that the cost was not too much for this family to bear. Item 14. $100.

 

Next is an item for those who enjoy Presbyterian cooking. Presbyterian cooking? Most Presbyterians probably don't even know what this is. Well, here it is: The Secrets of Mother's Pantry. Practical Receipts from the Tables of the Presbyterian Ladies. It was probably good hearty farm cooking since this booklet was prepared by the Ladies of the Presbyterian Church of St. Paul, Nebraska, in 1905. A terrible fire had destroyed their church in February and this was part of the effort to raise funds to replace it. Along with the recipes and local advertising are pictures of the church on fire and of the ruins that were left. Item 12. $95.

 

You probably think that being a litigious society is new, that something like suing your town because some boards on the street damaged your car is not something earlier generations would have done. Think again. Here is an example, although there were no automobiles in 1860. John H. White writes to the Selectmen of Strafford, New Hampshire, representing Joseph Drew. White claims, “his sleigh came in contact with two boards negligently left across the travelled part of the road,- that his horse was injured thereby and became unmanageable, injured Mr D & damaged the sleigh to the Amt of $10... Mr D wishes me to say to you that he shall look to the town of Strafford for compensation.” Item 28. $50.

 

The Pages of Yesteryear may be reached at 203-426-0864 or jrenjilian@hotmail.com.

AE Monthly


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