• <b>Bonhams New York, FINE BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, 10 Dec 2014.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 5. FESTBUCH: Procession Following Charles V's Coronation as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement<br>VII. Est. $120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 6. GUTENBERG BIBLE. [Bible in Latin. Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Fust, 1455.] Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 21. CORONELLI, VICENZO MARIA.<br>1650-1718. [Atlante Veneto.]<br> Est. $25,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 33. GIGAULT DE LA SALLE, ACHILLE ÉTIENNE. 1772-1840. Voyage pittoresque en Sicile. Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 50. ROTTERDAM. [DE HOOGHE, ROMEYN, AND JOANNES DE VOU.] Album.<br>Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 77. JOSEPH, MICHAEL. A Book of Cats. Covici Friede, 1930. Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 124. DICKENS, CHARLES. 1812-1870. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Est. $20,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 145. SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Shakespear's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 160. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Pomes Penyeach. Paris: Obelisk Press. [September] 1932. Est. $45,000-75,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 7: A collection of letters and documents of Scottish industrialist & politician<br>D. J. Macdonald, 1922–1939.<br>£3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 9: MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY – A collection of material relating to the evolution of broadcasting in the early 20th century. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 27: Francesco Maurolico (1494–1575). <i>Martyrologium … Francisci Maurolyci … multo quam antea purgatum, & locupletatum</i>. Venice: Lucas Antonius Giunta, 1568. £6,000–9,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 39: Henry Purcell (1659–1695). <i>Orpheus Britannicus</i>. A Collection of all the Choicest Songs for One, Two, and Three Voices. London: for Henry Playford, 1698–1702. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 111: Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598). <i>Theatrum oder Schwabüch des Erdtkreijs</i>. Antwerp: [Jan Baptist Vrients], 1602. £10,000–15,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 138: W. L. Wyllie and H. W. Brewer. <i>Bird's Eye View of London as seen from a balloon</i>. London: The Graphic, 1884. £3,000–5,000
    <b>Christies South Kensington:</b> Lot 202: John Speed (1552–1629). <i>The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine</i>. London, 1627–[46]. £15,000–25,000
  • <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Bill Wilson, Alcoholics Anonymous. Stunning first edition in original dust jacket.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Valentine Davies, Miracle on 34th Street. A holiday favorite.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility. Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jack Kerouac, On the Road. The Beat generation bible.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman. An exceptional first edition.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. Rare London edition, the first in English.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> William Wordsworth, Poems. In a charming full-morocco binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451. In the publisher’s asbestos binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian. McCarthy’s best book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. A Fine copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Robert Bloch, Psycho. A lovely copy of a fragile book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. A perennial favorite.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - August - 2014 Issue

Polar Voyages from Yesterday's Muse Books

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Polar Voyages.

Yesterday's Muse Books is taking us very far north (or south) with their latest catalogue: Polar Voyages, works treating the exploration of the Arctic and Antarctic, detailing the efforts of numerous expeditions in their quest for the North Pole, South Pole, and Northwest Passage. Arctic exploration has fascinated us for centuries. It's not just a question of what is to be found. We already know the answer for the most part – ice. What is so riveting about these accounts is the incredible challenges in reaching their goals. Extreme cold and terrible storms, plus dangerous, ice-laden seas made these the most difficult of explorations. It is almost unimaginable how many people took on such extreme hardships, all in the cause of knowledge. Here are a few of these chilly books.

 

There were two major goals in the history of polar exploration. One was to find a northwest passage, a shorter route from Europe to Asia by sailing north of Canada. After centuries of unsuccessful attempts and much loss of life, the route was finally discovered. Unfortunately, it is too shallow and frozen over too much of the year to be of much practical use. The other goal was to reach the poles, more of a quest to be achieved because they “are there” than of serious practical benefit. Each was achieved around the turn of the 20th century. Item 18 is the first claimed reaching of a pole, in this case the northern one. The claim was long ago discredited. Item 18 is Frederick Cook's My Attainment of the Pole: Being the Record of the Expedition that First Reached the Boreal Center, 1907-1909. With the Final Summary of the Polar Controversy. Cook was on a hunting expedition when he, two Eskimos, and 26 dogs, supposedly made a successful run to the North Pole. However, most, if kind, think Cook misread his instruments. Many others think he just made it up, and there were other incidents in Cook's history that made him somewhat questionable. However, it should be noted that Cook had his brave side, and he never lost the admiration of Roald Amundsen, the first both to reach the South Pole and find the Northwest Passage, the result of an earlier voyage together. Offered is a third printing from 1913, signed and inscribed by Cook. Priced at $85.

 

The man most often given credit as the first to reach the North Pole is Robert Peary. For a long time, his claim was almost universally accepted, but in more recent years, doubt has been raised as to the accuracy of Peary's beliefs, if not his honesty. Peary's success, if it was, was achieved during his third attempt in 1909. Item 69 is his account of his second attempt, which may have been the farthest north ever reached at the time (or, maybe not): Nearest the Pole: A Narrative of the Polar Expedition of the Peary Arctic Club in the S. S. Roosevelt, 1905-1906, published in 1907. He did manage to reach beyond a latitude of 87 degrees. As with his famed third and final journey, Peary and the Roosevelt made their way to northern Ellesmere Island, in the far north of Canada near Greenland, before setting out on sledges for the pole. $75.

 

If neither Cook nor Peary reached the North Pole, then this would be the first success, as it is well documented. Nonetheless, this is sort of cheating too. It was a fly over. Planes weren't flying as far as the poles in 1909, but by 1926, that was possible, though a bit harrowing. If this was the first, then it completed an amazing trifecta for one of the participants. That would be Roald Amundsen, who was the first to reach the South Pole, and the first to find the Northwest Passage. Item 3 is First Crossing of the Polar Sea, by Amundsen and his partner, Lincoln Ellsworth, published in 1927. Item 3. $65.

 

Of all the journeys in attempt to find a northwest passage, that of Sir John Franklin is best known. It is remembered for the same reason that Custer's last Indian battle is so well known. It ended in disaster. When no trace was found of Franklin within a reasonable time, missions were sent out to find him. Many were sent, and many were unsuccessful. American philanthropist Henry Grinnell financed two of them. Item 42 is The U. S. Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin, by the mission's surgeon, Elisha Kent Kane. The first Grinnell Expedition ran from 1850-1851, with the account published in 1854. It did not find Franklin, though many artifacts were located, and they, along with other searchers, found three graves of Franklin's men on Beechy Island, not quite so far north as Ellesmere. However, this encampment was from before Franklin ran into trouble, while they wintered over, and the three graves were of men who died from lead poisoning, not climate or starvation. $150.

 

Kent not only wrote the account of the Second Grinnell Expedition, he also led it. Item 43 is Arctic Explorations: The Second Grinnell Expedition in Search of Sir John Franklin, 1853, '54, '55. Like the first, it brought back scientific information, but not Franklin. It would not be until the end of the decade that the mystery would be unraveled. They searched around Baffin Bay, eventually becoming trapped in the ice. After two winters, they concluded the ship would never be free, and proceeded on a dangerous journey over the frozen sea. Fortunately, Kane and his men had the sense to establish good relationships with the native Inuit, which Franklin failed to do, providing the help they needed to survive. $150.

 

Here is another voyage that did not end well. In 1879, George Washington DeLong, a U. S. naval officer, led an expedition that hoped to reach the North Pole. They started in California, hoping to pass through the Bering Strait between Alaska and Russia, and on north until they reached the pole. Evidently, they must have hoped for seas to be more open than they are. North of Siberia, their ship became entrapped in ice. For 19 months they remained in the ice until the pressure became so great it crushed the boat. They retreated to open water with three small boats and headed for Siberia. The three became separated. One boat was lost, never to be found. Another made it to the coast and was later rescued. The third, with DeLong, made it to the coast but could not find rescue. Only two men sent to find help survived. The others, DeLong included, perished from cold and starvation. Item 21 is The Voyage of the Jeannette. The Ship and Ice Journals of George W. DeLong...Commander of the Polar Expedition of 1879-1881. It includes notes DeLong made as well as accounts by survivors. Published in 1884, the book was edited by DeLong's widow, Emma. $375.

 

Yesterday's Muse Books may be reached at 585-265-9295 or yesterdays.muse@gmail.com. Their website is found at www.websterbookstore.com.

AE Monthly


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