• <b>Bonhams New York, FINE BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, 10 Dec 2014.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 5. FESTBUCH: Procession Following Charles V's Coronation as Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Clement<br>VII. Est. $120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 6. GUTENBERG BIBLE. [Bible in Latin. Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Fust, 1455.] Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 21. CORONELLI, VICENZO MARIA.<br>1650-1718. [Atlante Veneto.]<br> Est. $25,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 33. GIGAULT DE LA SALLE, ACHILLE ÉTIENNE. 1772-1840. Voyage pittoresque en Sicile. Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 50. ROTTERDAM. [DE HOOGHE, ROMEYN, AND JOANNES DE VOU.] Album.<br>Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 77. JOSEPH, MICHAEL. A Book of Cats. Covici Friede, 1930. Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 124. DICKENS, CHARLES. 1812-1870. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Est. $20,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 145. SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Shakespear's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Dec 10th: </b>Lot 160. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. Pomes Penyeach. Paris: Obelisk Press. [September] 1932. Est. $45,000-75,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Abraham Lincoln, "a previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality." From the collection of John Hay.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Bill Wilson, Alcoholics Anonymous. Stunning first edition in original dust jacket.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Valentine Davies, Miracle on 34th Street. A holiday favorite.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility. Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Jack Kerouac, On the Road. The Beat generation bible.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman. An exceptional first edition.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. Rare London edition, the first in English.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> William Wordsworth, Poems. In a charming full-morocco binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Print catalogues regularly issued, call or email for a copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451. In the publisher’s asbestos binding.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian. McCarthy’s best book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles. A Fine copy.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Seeking to purchase fine books and collections.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Robert Bloch, Psycho. A lovely copy of a fragile book.
    <b>Whitmore Rare Books.</b> Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. A perennial favorite.
  • <b>Christie's BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, Tuesday, 4 December 2014.</b>
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 6. [DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.] The Pennsylvania Ledger... 13 July 1776. In Congress, July 4, 1776.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 24. JEFFERSON Thomas. Autograph letter signed ("Th: Jefferson"), as Secretary of State, to Jean Antoine Gautier, Philadelphia. 8 June 1792.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 33. LINCOLN, Abraham (1809-1865). GERMAN, C.S. photographer. Large oval photograph portrait signed and dated. Taken in Springfield, Illinois. Jan 1861.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 75. WARRE, Henry James (1819-1898). Sketches in North America and the Oregon Territory. [London]: Dickenson & Co. [1848]. First Edition, Colored Issue.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 161. REDOUTÉ, Pierre-Joseph (1759-1840) and Claude Antoine THORY (1759-1827). Les Roses. Paris: Firmin Didot, 1817-1824. Largest paper copy.
    <b>Christie's BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, Tuesday, 4 December 2014.</b>
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 193. NEES VON ESENBECK, Elise (1842-1921).<br>A collection of original drawings of Orchids in five albums.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 201. COPERNICUS, Nicolaus. De revolutionibus orbium coelestium. Georg Johann RHETICUS.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 202. DARWIN, Charles (1809-1882). On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection. John Murray, 1859.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 208. DYLAN, Bob (b. 1941). Original manuscript and typescript for "Talking Blues", published as "Talkin Folklore Center," New York, 1962.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 216.<br>GALILEI, Galileo. Dialogo... sopre i due massimi sistemi del mondo Tolemaico, e Copernicano.
    <b>Christie's BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS, Tuesday, 4 December 2014.</b>
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 222. HEVELIUS, Johannes (1611-1687). Mercurius in sole visus Gedani, anno christiano MDCLXI...
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 226.<br>HUYGENS, Christiaan (1629-1695). Horologium oscillatorium sive de motu pendulorum ad horologia... Paris: F. Muguet, 1673.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 227. IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA, Saint (1491-1556). Exercitia Spiritualia. Rome: Antonio Blado, 11 September 1548.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 251. SHAKESPEARE, William (1564-1616). Comedies, Histories and Tragedies. Published according to the true Originall Copies. Second Impression.
    <b>Christies Dec 4th:</b> Lot 260. VESALIUS, Andreas (1514-1564). De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basel: Johannes Oporinus, June 1543.

AE Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - February - 2014 Issue

Americana from Walkabout Books

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Americana from Walkabout Books.

Walkabout Books of Laguna Niguel, California, has issued their second catalogue, appropriately enough titled Catalogue Two. Americana. Offered is a great selection of modestly priced items relating to America, mostly from the 19th or early 20th century. With a very few exceptions (over and under), items are available for three figures, generally lower three figures. Nevertheless, it is filled with fascinating pieces, including numerous selections relating to California locales, the Alaska Gold Rush, treatment of America's natives, slavery and abolition, and western travel. Many other American topics are also to be found. Here is a scattered sample of these works.

 

Who would ask a doctor for medical advice when you can turn to a cowboy instead? The answer is too many gullible Americans. Item 52 is a 48-page production from the “Cowboy Herbalist,” one Charlie White-Moon (real name Charles Bunce). You know the story – saved by Indians, Charlie lives with them and learns their secret remedies, which he now offers to dumb white people. Newspaper records indicate his cure, known as “Com-Cel-Sar,” was promoted during the teens, and this one fits in, dated 1912. The title is The Cow-Boy and Com-Cel-Sar. Charlie liked hyphens almost as much as he liked money. Presumably, “Com-Cel-Sar” is some sort of Indian word, though I find it in no dictionaries. This product combines roots and herbs to create a cleansing tonic that rids the body of “useless matter, undigested foods and the like.” Sounds like it probably had some mild laxative properties. However, it is dubious that it had much effect against disease. Priced at $75.

 

Wilson Lumpkin was a successful political figure in Georgia during the first half of the 19th century. Along with serving as a state representative, he earned terms in the U.S. House, the U.S. Senate, and two terms as Governor of Georgia, from 1831-1835. His positions undoubtedly made him a popular man at the time, but those who come across his name today will more likely look back at his career in disgust. He accomplished a number of things through the course of his life, but that for which he was most proud was his role in the forcible removal of the Cherokee and other Indians from their ancient homelands in Georgia. He sent them to far off Oklahoma, the horrific Trail of Tears. It is likely no other man played a greater role in this tragedy. He was an early advocate for Indian removal, a prime mover in passing such legislation, worked closely with Andrew Jackson in his shameful support of removal, ignored the U.S. Supreme Court ruling protecting the Indians' rights to their land, and after his term was over served on the commission to enforce the “treaty” signed by a small group of Cherokee consenting to removal, and guarded its final stages in the senate. Of course, he always claimed this was for the good of the Indians, as did Jackson, even as he held the lottery which gave away Indian land to white settlers. Item 29 is The Removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia, Including His Speeches in the United States Congress on the Indian Question... This is a two-volume set, one of 500 copies, compiled by Wymberley Jones DeRenne from Lumpkin's manuscript and published in 1907, several decades after the Governor died. $600.

 

Item 92 is Dissolution or Physical Death, and How Spirit Chemists Produce Materialization, by Michael Faraday. No, it isn't by Faraday. Poor Michael Faraday. He was one of the great scientists, a physicist and chemist who made numerous discoveries concerning electricity and magnetism. It is he who is responsible for the electric motor and generator. What Faraday was not was a spiritualist. Indeed, he was a most vocal opponent, and devised experiments to show how reputed visits from spirits at seances were false. So, after Faraday died in 1867, he became something of a target for spiritualists, who reported having visits from the deceased scientist. This is one such example, published in 1887. In it, the spirit of the departed Faraday supposedly comes back to tell us how we can live after our bodies have died. $100.

 

Item 22 is a rare early issue of San Francisco's first newspaper, and California's second. It is Vol. 1, No. 7 of The California Star, dated February 20, 1847. It tells news of what was then a lightly populated land of uncertain ownership. The U.S. military had seized it from Mexican control, and settlers from America had also participated, but the Mexican War was still ongoing at the time, and California had been Mexican territory. Nonetheless, the Americans were in control. The Star had its editorial viewpoint, critical of Governor Robert Stockton. It describes him as a “pompous, bloated, demagogue.” It is more favorably inclined toward his military rival, General Stephen Kearney. The paper includes numerous articles of local news, but perhaps the most intriguing item is a small classified advertisement. It was placed by John Sutter. It is a want ad for “two Thrashing Machines for wheat of a size and sufficient power for a crop of some 40,000 bushels.” Soon enough, Sutter would discover something far more interesting than wheat on his farm. Within a year, gold would be discovered near Sutter's Mill, and the California Gold Rush was on. $3,500.

AE Monthly


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