• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London.<br>US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DRURY, JOTHAM. PLANNING THE BOSTON TEA PARTY. Autograph Document Signed. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. US$ 50,000 - 70,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CORINTH, MISSISSIPPI IN 1862. Albumen print photograph. US$ 1,000 - 1,500.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. US$ 15,000 - 20,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [EDISON, THOMAS ALVA. 1847-1931.] Engraved $1 Bill, Endorsed and Signed by Charles L. Clarke on face. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. US$ 15,000 - 25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CASSIDY, BUTCH. Carte-de-visite police photograph.<br>US$ 20,000 - 30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [BUFFALO BILL.] <i>The Great Train Hold-Up & Bandit Hunters of the Union Pacific</i>. US$ 3,000 - 5,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> MONTESQUIEU Refflexions sur le caractere de quelques Princes. [1734]. 68 autograph pages.<br>Estimate €150,000-200,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LOUIS XVI Autograph letter to Gabrielle de Polignac. (VERSAILLES) 12 SEPTEMBRE 1789. Estimate €10,000-15,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LOUIS XVI Autograph letter to Gabrielle de Polignac. PARIS, 9 FÉVRIER 1790.<br>Estimate €15,000-20,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> SCHEDEL, Hartmann. Liber chronicarum. July 1493. Richly annotated by a French humanist.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris: Livres et Manuscrits, 26 NOVEMBER 2013.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> GAUGUIN, Paul. The first known letter to his wife Mette. 1883. Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> MAURRAS, Charles. Letter to general Franco. 30 août 1935. And 5 first editions inscribed to Anatole France, Ramon Fernandez...<br>Estimate €8,000-12,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> PROUST. Placard for A l’ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs, with a long autograph passage, remained unpublished.<br>Estimate €30,000-40,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris: Livres et Manuscrits, 26 NOVEMBER 2013.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> [PROUST] – André GIDE. The draft for the famous letter from Gide to Proust repenting about his refusal to publish him. 10 or 11 January 1914. Estimate €100,000-150,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> DELAUNAY, Sonia. 3 drawings for La Prose du Transsibérien’s prospectus. 1913. Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> CELINE. Voyage au bout de la nuit. 1932. André Breton’s copy with an inscription by Céline. Estimate €10,000-15,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LINDBERGH, Charles. Photographic portrait, inscribed to Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. 1939. €2,500-3,500.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Alexander Gardner photograph portrait (1863), signed by Abraham Lincoln.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.

AE Monthly

Reviews - February - 2014 Issue

American Autographed Documents from Joe Rubinfine

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American historical documents.

Joe Rubinfine has issued List 174 of American Historical Autographs. This is a collection of documents, occasionally a small form but mostly larger papers, including handwritten letters, from important personalities in American history. Some come from the height of their powers or significance, others from the days before they were well-known, or after their retirement from notable positions. Personal documents give us great insight into the personalities of those we otherwise know only from third-party accounts, often distorted by the opinions of those outsiders. These documents often provide a look into the hearts and minds of those who may have become icons, but were once real people like the rest of us. Here are a few of these documents.

 

We will start with an amazing letter from one of America's best known soldiers, though more for the wrong reason than the right. George Armstrong Custer will always be remembered for his final defeat because it was so thorough. Neither he nor any of his men survived his one-sided loss in the Battle of Little Big Horn. His reputation was ruined, but his loyal wife, Elizabeth Custer, spent the remaining 57 years of her life rehabilitating the honor of her late husband. General Custer was hardly a great soldier, and his ego a bit oversized, but one thing that cannot be doubted about the General and his wife was the truly devoted love they held for each other. This was a love story few could match. If there is any doubt that Gen. Custer shared the love for Elizabeth that she displayed towards him in her 57 years of widowhood, that should be dispelled by this letter. Item 10 is a letter from Custer to his wife dated January 14, 1869, from Fort Cobb (now Fort Sill) Oklahoma, to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. It is addressed to “Darling of all the World.” The letter is 39 pages in length. Seriously. Try tweeting or texting that! Obviously, Custer has lots to say. He talks about his brother's loneliness and tendency to drown his sorrows in alcohol. He speaks highly of a newly arrived subordinate, Major Marcus Reno, who would be a major figure in the story of the disaster at Little Big Horn, blamed by many for not providing Custer sufficient support when things went wrong. Others involved in that tragic battle also appear in this letter. Still, what stands out is the enormous affection Custer expresses for his wife. He talks of retrieving the mail late at night because he knew there would be a dozen letters from Elizabeth, and sure enough, his estimate was precisely correct. He received an even dozen from the “Queen of Women.” Custer writes, “...there is a little woman...who can lead her boy whither she chooses...to her will I am ready a slave...they may take the Battle of the Washita and all the renown I have reaped from it – if I can only be permitted to go to you and there remain.” Priced at $100,000.

 

Here is an ironic item that relates to a forgotten event that changed American history in ways that are incalculable yet will forever be unknown. Item 28 is an official appointment from 1865 by President Andrew Johnson, appointing Hannibal Hamlin as Customs Collector in Boston. The appointment of Hamlin to such a minor post, that served more as a source of income than an important role in government, is unusual. At the start of the year, Hamlin was Vice-President of the United States. Indeed, it was Johnson who had replaced him in that office. President Lincoln had agreed to replace Hamlin with Johnson, not because of any problems with Hamlin, but for political advantage. Hamlin was an anti-slavery Republican from Maine, a constituency Lincoln felt confident in holding in what looked like a very challenging reelection campaign at the time of his nomination. Johnson was a “War Democrat,” a loyal union supporter but otherwise more appealing to less radical and more southern oriented constituencies. Lincoln made the switch for practical political reasons, and Hamlin loyally supported his reelection. Of course, no one could have anticipated what would happen. Lincoln was assassinated, and because of the political switch, it was the new vice-president, Johnson, who succeeded him, rather than Hamlin. His more moderate, sympathetic views toward the South, which almost got him removed from office, were undoubtedly very different from the approach Hamlin would have taken. American history would have turned out differently, though no one can say just how. Johnson likely felt he owed something to Hamlin in making this appointment. However, the latter would resign from this post a year later in protest of Johnson's policies, and returned to the senate in 1868, serving until 1880. Amazingly enough, Hamlin, who died in 1891, outlived the next six vice-presidents who succeeded him in office. $4,500.

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