• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. Sold for US$ 45,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. Sold for US$ 6,875 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. Sold for US$ 100,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. Sold for US$ 118,750 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. Sold for US$ 257,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. Sold for US$ 15,000 inc. premium.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. Sold for US$ 13,750 inc. premium.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - February - 2014 Issue

Sotheran's Issues Their Latest Piccadilly Notes

578987af-5eff-439b-923e-6a80540d0bac

Piccadilly Notes 59.

Sotheran's has issued the latest in a long-running catalogue series entitled Piccadilly Notes 59 Winter 2013. They have been issuing Piccadilly Notes for almost a century, but that is a recent development by Sotheran's standards. They have been selling books for two and one-half centuries. These catalogues are a compilation of various types of books, more a miscellany than subject specific. The presentation is thorough with everything well illustrated. These are outstanding catalogues with much of great interest to be found. These are just a few examples.

 

We start with the first book ever printed. Well...not really. It has been a long time since a copy of anything more than a leaf or two of the Gutenberg Bible has come on the market. It is unimaginable what the price would be if one did, but none of us could afford it. Here is the next best thing. Item 37 is a facsimile edition of the Gutenberg Bible. Published in 1961, it was the first Gutenberg facsimile printed in the United States, and only the second in the world. It was produced from two originals in Germany, one of which is considered by authorities to be the most beautifully illuminated of all copies. The original was completed around 1456, the first printed book ever. It changed the world like few other events. Priced at £3,995 (British pounds, or approximately $6,577 in U.S. dollars).

 

Here is an interesting combination – a cookbook and medical text. Today one would not expect to see these subjects combined, but in 1741, medicine was not so advanced. Item 15 is The Family Magazine: in Two Parts. Part I. Containing Useful Directions in All the Branches of House-Keeping and Cookery... Part II. Containing a Compendious Body of Physick... You may use Part I if you would like to learn how to prepare some traditional meals. Don't use Part II for anything other than entertainment. Arnold Oxford's bibliography of early English cookbooks says the cookery part is excellent, but the medical book is “full of horrors.” For example, the cure for appendicitis is to “apply a live puppy to the naked belly.” Of course, applying a live puppy won't by itself cure appendicitis, so you should also apply a combination of rotten apples and sheep's dung boiled in milk. If you are out of rotten apples and sheep's dung, we recommend getting yourself to a hospital really quickly as an alternative. The author is given as Arabella Atkyns, though the writer admits in the preface that this is a pseudonym. £998 (US $1,643).

 

It is safe to say that Michael Faraday made better use of the scientific method than did “Ms. Atkyns.” Faraday is most noted for his discoveries relating to electricity and electromagnetism. His work led to the electric motor and electric generator, both based on the ability of electricity to create magnetism and vice versa. While Faraday was conducting his experiments, he kept a diary. He continued for 42 years, with his original manuscript being given to the Royal Institution of Great Britain. It was published in eight volumes from 1932-1936 under the title Faraday's Diary. Being the Various Philosophical Notes of Experimental Investigation Made by Michael Faraday...During the Years 1820-1862... It includes not only Faraday's text, but the diagrams he drew in the margins of his diary. Item 143. £1,250 (US $2,058).

 

Here is another diary, though the diarist is not so famous. In fact, we don't know who he is, other than his name is “Sam.” It covers a trip to Europe from New York by three young men, from July 2 – September 3, 1913. They do the grand tour of Europe, including Italy, France, and Holland, before ending up in London. However, it's the voyage to Europe that is most intriguing. They sailed on the RMS Carpathia. As you may recall, it was the Carpathia that rescued those who found room in the lifeboats and thereby survived the sinking of the Titanic the previous year. Sam writes about the girls, games, and good food on the ship, including a shuffleboard tournament. The diary is accompanied by a photo album showing life on board. There was also a needle-threading contest and fancy dress parties. Sam's biggest complaint is their room, which was not very roomy. Such is the fate of low-fare passengers. “Our stateroom is very unsatisfactory, being a small room with four berths, no wardrobe... Only two at a time can dress not very comfortably at that. Room is very hot, and stuffy.” Nonetheless, the Oceanic, on which they made their return trip, was “far inferior.” At one point, the Carpathia rescues another vessel whose engine has broken down. The lack of reference to the ship's dramatic rescue the year before makes Sotheran's wonder whether Sam even knew about the Carpathia's historic role. Item 54. £998 (US $1,644).

AE Monthly


Review Search

Archived Reviews

Ask Questions