• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London.<br>US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DRURY, JOTHAM. PLANNING THE BOSTON TEA PARTY. Autograph Document Signed. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. US$ 50,000 - 70,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CORINTH, MISSISSIPPI IN 1862. Albumen print photograph. US$ 1,000 - 1,500.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. US$ 15,000 - 20,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [EDISON, THOMAS ALVA. 1847-1931.] Engraved $1 Bill, Endorsed and Signed by Charles L. Clarke on face. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. US$ 15,000 - 25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CASSIDY, BUTCH. Carte-de-visite police photograph.<br>US$ 20,000 - 30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [BUFFALO BILL.] <i>The Great Train Hold-Up & Bandit Hunters of the Union Pacific</i>. US$ 3,000 - 5,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> MONTESQUIEU Refflexions sur le caractere de quelques Princes. [1734]. 68 autograph pages.<br>Estimate €150,000-200,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LOUIS XVI Autograph letter to Gabrielle de Polignac. (VERSAILLES) 12 SEPTEMBRE 1789. Estimate €10,000-15,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LOUIS XVI Autograph letter to Gabrielle de Polignac. PARIS, 9 FÉVRIER 1790.<br>Estimate €15,000-20,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> SCHEDEL, Hartmann. Liber chronicarum. July 1493. Richly annotated by a French humanist.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris: Livres et Manuscrits, 26 NOVEMBER 2013.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> GAUGUIN, Paul. The first known letter to his wife Mette. 1883. Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> MAURRAS, Charles. Letter to general Franco. 30 août 1935. And 5 first editions inscribed to Anatole France, Ramon Fernandez...<br>Estimate €8,000-12,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> PROUST. Placard for A l’ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs, with a long autograph passage, remained unpublished.<br>Estimate €30,000-40,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris: Livres et Manuscrits, 26 NOVEMBER 2013.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> [PROUST] – André GIDE. The draft for the famous letter from Gide to Proust repenting about his refusal to publish him. 10 or 11 January 1914. Estimate €100,000-150,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> DELAUNAY, Sonia. 3 drawings for La Prose du Transsibérien’s prospectus. 1913. Estimate €20,000-30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> CELINE. Voyage au bout de la nuit. 1932. André Breton’s copy with an inscription by Céline. Estimate €10,000-15,000.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris:</b> LINDBERGH, Charles. Photographic portrait, inscribed to Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. 1939. €2,500-3,500.
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Alexander Gardner photograph portrait (1863), signed by Abraham Lincoln.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.

AE Monthly

Reviews - November - 2013 Issue

Marc Selvaggio is In Search of Ephemera

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In Search of Ephemera!

Marc Selvaggio, Books & Ephemera has issued their Catalogue 140. In Search of Ephemera! They have found it - over 400 items. These may not be memorable literary works. Great writers and illustrators are absent. The inexpensive prices reflect this reality. Most is advertising and promotional material. What this catalogue provides is a whole lot of fun, and many items you can't help but want to have. Advertisers have been trying to sell their wares from the time wares were invented. Some in this catalogue are useful, others pure quackery. Surely there was a sucker born every minute back in the days these were produced, just as there is today. It's fun to look at yesterday's fools, ignoring that we are today's edition. Here are a few samples.

 

We begin with an amazing advance in aircraft technology from 1929: The Flyworm Aircraft. The First Truly New Principle in Aviation Since Wright Bros. Indeed it probably was, so long as one recognizes that a truly new principle does not mean it is a good one. The Wright Bros. first flight of 120 feet was a good 120 feet farther than the Flyworm ever flew. The precise principles behind this very strange looking aircraft have been lost to history, although its designer, Paul Maiwurm, was evidently an inventive man, but was not prepared for the numerous defects in this invention. The Flyworm featured a large barrel-shaped cylinder, roughly 4 feet in diameter, 6 feet long. It was spun by a motor below, with various forces supposed to achieve lift-off, but apparently achieved violent shaking as well. Part of the contraption broke in his first demonstration, and there is no record of any further ones though Maiwurm continued to try for at least a while. Perhaps it was some sort of early jet technology Maiwurm was employing. Item 46 is a four-page flyer issued as he attempted to gather some financing for his plane's development. In a moment of brutal honesty, it does point out, “Because of certain minor details not yet worked out to Mr. Maiwurm's critical satisfaction, and because of the lack of a modern motor, no effort has yet been made to test the Flyworm in the air, but the results to date have absolutely convinced Mr. Maiwurm and his associates that when all the minor details have been completed the new air ship will take to the air.” The pamphlet comes with a typescript letter and two original postcards. Priced at $350.

 

Roswell Marsh was a man ahead of his time. Circa 1872 this Ohio native published this broadside headed Hemp-Cannabis-Sativa. It promoted increased production of cannabis, a message that has been taken to heart recently in several western states. However, Marsh was interested in more than having a good time. Hemp was needed for cordage, making ropes, in greater demand in the 19th century for use on ships. Item 19. $100.

 

Modern technology has protected us from the risk earlier generations faced of falling out of windows, but T. P. Tuite provided an interim solution back in 1896 in the this four-page pamphlet: Fatal Fall from a Fire-Escape While Engaged in Taking in Clothes... Those were the days when women living in tenements hung out of windows and over fire-escapes to reach the clothesline (remember those?) to hang the wash. Tuite has kindly shown us a few images of women falling out of windows just to make sure the message is understood. He offered some sort of “crane” that protected the lady of the house (men didn't do wash in 1896) from falling to her demise. Now let us all be thankful for the clothes dryer. Item 326. $35.

 

Item 88 is a 1917 employment brochure from J. C. Penney: Men Wanted. Penneys wanted only “men of sterling qualities,” none who drink, smoke, gamble, who lack initiative or are apathetic...” In other words, they wanted “the steel rails of business, which is but another name for MEN.” Only manly men need apply. “It wants men free from defects,” Penneys says, ignoring the fact that such creatures do not exist. $35.

 

There may be some unusual laws in Illinois, but who knew, as this booklet pronounces, Saving Life a Crime in Illinois. This was the work of James Armstrong, M.D., a self-righteous physician whom the State of Illinois determined to be a quack. For some incomprehensible reason, the Illinois Supreme Court ruled that Armstrong's Illinois Health University, which consisted of two rooms in a building with a “Furnished Rooms for Rent” sign in the window, was a diploma mill. The Supreme Court felt such things as not requiring class attendance were a sign that the school was sending incompetent men across the country to practice medicine. Dr. Armstrong sets the record state in this 56-page pamphlet from 1895. Item 287. $250.

AE Monthly


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