• <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> FIRE OF LONDON. A True Pourtraict with a Brief Description Of that Deplorable Fire of London.<br>US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MATHER, INCREASE. A Brief History of the Warr With the Indians in New-England. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Manuscript Document variously signed. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> REVERE, PAUL. The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DRURY, JOTHAM. PLANNING THE BOSTON TEA PARTY. Autograph Document Signed. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> LEXINGTON AND CONCORD. Bloody Butchery by the British Troops. US$ 25,000 - 35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. The New-England Chronicle. US$ 50,000 - 70,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CORINTH, MISSISSIPPI IN 1862. Albumen print photograph. US$ 1,000 - 1,500.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. By the President of the United States. US$ 15,000 - 20,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [EDISON, THOMAS ALVA. 1847-1931.] Engraved $1 Bill, Endorsed and Signed by Charles L. Clarke on face. US$ 8,000 - 12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> BASEBALL. Boston Union Athletic Exhibition Company Grounds. US$ 15,000 - 25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> CASSIDY, BUTCH. Carte-de-visite police photograph.<br>US$ 20,000 - 30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> [BUFFALO BILL.] <i>The Great Train Hold-Up & Bandit Hunters of the Union Pacific</i>. US$ 3,000 - 5,000.
    <b>Bonhams 7 Apr 2014, Eric Caren Archive:</b> MCCLELLAND, GEORGE WILLIAM. Eniac-Birth Certificate of Computer Age. 1880-1955. Typed Letter Signed. US$ 6,000 - 8,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.First edition, first issue in a near fine jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1926. First edition, first issue.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Jack Kerouac. On the Road. New York: Viking, 1957. First edition, presentation copy.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>JRR Tolkien. The Hobbit. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1937. First edition, fine copy in jacket.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Vladimir Nabokov. Lolita. Paris: the Olympia Press, 1955. First edition presentation copy inscribed on the half-title.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Tennessee Williams. A Streetcar Named Desire. Norfolk, CT: New Directions, 1947. Inscribed by Tennesee Williams and Director Elia Kazan with additional inscriptions or signatures by all the cast members.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>T.S. Eliot. The Waste Land. Richmond, Surrey: Printed and published by Leonard and Virignia Woolf, 1923. First English edition, nscribed to Eliot’s patroness Lady Mary Lilian Rothermere.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Ernest Hemingway. Three Stories and Ten Poems. Paris: Contact Publishing Co., 1923. A mint first edition presentation copy of Hemingway’s landmark first book.
    <b>Sotheby's New York, 1 April 2014: </b> A Modern Library: The Gordon Waldorf Collection.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>William Faulkner. Light in August. New York: Harrison Smith & Robert Haas, 1932. First edition inscribed to Myrtle Ramey.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>James Joyce. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First edition, one of 150 press-numbered copies on vergé d’Arches.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>F. Scott Fitzgerald. This Side of Paradise. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920. First edition with jacket in fine condition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Dashiell Hammett. The Thin Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, MCMXXXIV. First American edition. A presentation copy inscribed.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Raymond Chandler. Farewell, My Lovely. New York: Knopf, 1940. First edition presentation copy, being a copy that Chandler originally retained, inscribed on the front endpaper.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1951. First edition.
    <b>Sotheby's New York: </b>Anthony Burgess. A Clockwork Orange. London: Heinemann, 1962. First edition and a rare presentation copy inscribed by the author.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> DALI, BRETON, V. HUGO and GALA. <i>Surrealist portrait of Lenin</i>. 1932. Cadavre exquis signed by all four. On a postcard addressed to René Char. Estimate €15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> CELINE. <i>Voyage au bout de la nuit</i>. One of 20 copies on vélin d’Arches, inscribed to Roland Saucier and a binding by A. Cerutti. Estimate €80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> PROUST. <i>Autograph letter to Gaston Gallimard</i>, about the Jeunes filles en fleurs and his dreyffusian past. December 21, 1919. 4 pages. Estimate €10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> REVERDY. <i>La Lucarne ovale. 1916</i>. First edition. One of 6 copies on Japan paper. Binding by Jean de Gonet. With a letter by Pierre Albert-Birot. Estimate €28,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> STENDHAL. <i>Histoire de la Peinture en Italie</i>. 1817. First edition, inscribed to count Kosakowsky.<br>Estimate €20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> BAUDELAIRE. Théophile Gautier. 1859. Exceptional copy with contemporary binding, inscribed to Edouard Manet.<br>Estimate €40,000-60,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> OVIDIUS. [<i>Complete works</i>]. Venice, Aldus, 1502-1503. 17th cent. vellum. Estimate €3,000-5,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> GIEGHER. <i>Le Tre trattati</i>. Padova, 1639. Contemporary binding. Estimate €8,000-12,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROLEWINCK. <i>Fasciculus temporum</i>. Lyon, Huss, 1496. From the Seillières collection. Estimate €4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> AMUS. <i>32 autograph letters to Liliane Choucroun</i>. 1936-1952.<br>Estimate €60,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> LA FONTAINE. <i>Fables</i>. 1668. Morocco by Bedford. First collective edition. Estimate €6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris on 19 June 2014:</b> ROUAULT. <i>Cirque de l’étoile filante</i>. Ambroise Vollard, 1938. Fine binding by Creuzevault. Copy on Japon Impérial. Estimate €30,000-50,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop</b>. 30th anniversary catalogue of landmark rare books, autographs and manuscripts, and historical photographs of all ages.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. <i>The Federalist</i> (1788). An important association copy in original boards, untrimmed.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Important Age of Discovery manuscript (1512) with Christopher Columbus content.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.

AE Monthly

Reviews - November - 2013 Issue

Important Historic Documents from the Raab Collection

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History in documents from The Raab Collection.

The Raab Collection recently issued Catalog 76. The Raab Collection specializes in important historical documents, providing detailed explanations of how they fit in with the events which surrounded them. Most are signed by very well known figures, names who need little if any introduction. Most are also American historical documents, though we always find some from Europe, primarily England and France. These are a few of those documents presented in this latest selection.

 

Well into his retirement years, Former President John Adams carried on a correspondence with William Tudor, son of a friend, who was writing a biography of American patriot James Otis. In one of those letters, Adams told Tudor that “Negro Slavery is an evil of Colossal magnitude and I am utterly averse to the admission of Slavery into the Missouri Territories.” It was an astonishingly blunt statement for an early American leader, as most skirted around the moral compromise with slavery that enabled the northern and southern states to form a union. Then again, as of this time (1819), Adams was still the only northerner to serve as President, the other four all having been Virginians. Ultimately, a compromise would be reached on Missouri, it being admitted to the union as a slave state (against Adams' wishes) in return for a free Maine and limitations on the future expansion of slave states. Tudor was himself an abolitionist and wrote back to Adams, inquiring whether he could reveal Adams' comments at a meeting he planned to attend. Adams was reluctant. “Why should my little twine worn out as it is to a single thread, be woven into all these political hanks and snarls?” he wrote. “Is not fair, and therefore I hope you will by no means publish my letter - besides, it would only irritate and injure the Cause.” By the date of this letter (December 1, 1819), Adams' twine had 84 years of wear on it though he would live another six years. As to his reluctance to have his words known, it may be as he said. He did not exit the most popular of presidents and perhaps he thought he would hurt the cause. Alternatively, he may have thought such controversial opinions would harm the presidential aspirations of his son, John Quincy, or just no longer wished to get into battles at his advanced age. This letter (item 4), which covers other issues as well, is offered for $14,000.

 

Here is another unexpected letter from a U.S. President, though in this case he was a president future rather than president past. During the Mexican War, young Philip F. Coghlan, just 17 years old, wrote General Zachary Taylor offering his services. Taylor received plenty of correspondence during the war, far more than he could personally offer responses, but Coghlan's letter must have touched a nerve. Taylor's response might surprise you. Rather than accepting the patriotic offer, Taylor expressed his appreciation but answered Coghlan this was not yet his time. Wrote Taylor, “...while I greatly admire & appreciate your patriotic feelings, which has induced you to offer your services to aid in carrying on this war, yet from long experience in military matters, I must say you are of too tender an age to undergo the hardships common to camp life; the long marches the troops here have to make under an almost tropical sun, require men of mature age & great endurance; even many such have sunk here under the fatigues & privations referred to, more than have fallen by the bullets of the Mexicans. I must therefore recommend to you not to think of taking the field as a soldier...” Not exactly a recruiting letter, but Taylor was not a typical general. This letter was written on July 7, 1847, and a little over a year later, the immensely popular general would be elected President. Item 8. $11,000.

AE Monthly


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