WASHINGTON, George. Autograph letter signed ("G:o Washington"), as President-elect, TO JAMES MADISON, Mount Vernon, 16 February 1789

Lot Number 146
Author WASHINGTON, George
Title WASHINGTON, George. Autograph letter signed ("G:o Washington"), as President-elect, TO JAMES MADISON, Mount Vernon, 16 February 1789
Year Published 1789
Place Printed Mount Vernon
Printed By
Description WASHINGTON, George. Autograph letter signed ("G:o Washington"), as President-elect, TO JAMES MADISON, Mount Vernon, 16 February 1789. 11/2 pages, 4to, docketed on verso by Madison, show through, matted and framed with a color engraving of Washington.
Comments WASHINGTON, RELIEVED TO HAVE MADISON BY HIS SIDE IN NEW YORK, CONGRATULATES HIM ON HIS ELECTION TO THE FIRST CONGRESS "Having heard of your Election by a respectable majority of the suffrages of the District for which you stood; and conceiving it probable that you would soon be on your journey to New York...I take the liberty of submitting the papers herewith enclosed [not included], for your perusal, in case of that event." Washington was heading for Georgetown "to meet Governors Johnson and Lee." The President-elect and Madison spent much time together over the Christmas holidays, planning Washington's inaugural and mapping political strategy for the opening legislative session of the new government. With both men traveling, Washington wants to continue sending sensitive and confidential letters to Madison, but worries about preying eyes along the mail route. "You have a rough draft only of the letter I had in contemplation to write to you; so soon as I should have received your answer to the one I had written to you, soon after you left this. But having heard nothing from you since, I concluded that the intercourse between this [place] and Orange [County] was not very regular although, ultimately it might be safe....I shall certainly be back on Friday; probably on Thursday; when if you should in the meantime have arrived, it would give me much pleasure to see you at this place..." In a postscript Washington adds "If it should be your own desire, I have not the smallest objection to your conversing freely with Col. H. on all matters respecting this business." In his own hand, Madison has identified H. as "Humphreys." Madison's election to the House was no easy feat, thanks to the hatred of Governor Patrick Henry who refused to let Madison's name come before the legislature for election to the Senate. When Madison vied for a House seat instead, Henry rigged up a cumbersome, sprawling district that covered eight counties and favored Madison's opponent--his friend James Monroe! On 2 February, Madison won the tally by 1,308 votes to 972. Ironically, Madison would soon break with Washington and the Federalists and become the leader of the Congressional opposition to the administration. Published in Fitzpatrick 30:203-204.
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Estimated Price USD 30,000.00 - 50,000.00
Actual Price USD 80,500.00

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AUCTION DETAILS

Auction House Christies
Website http://www.christies.com
Auction Name Important Printed Books and Americana from The Albert H. Small Collection
Sale Number #2655
Auction Date May 18, 2012 - May 18, 2012
Book Images